To change your current location please select from one of Julius Baer’s locations below. Alternatively if your location is not listed please select international.

E-Services

Please select
Additional e-Services

*The location identified is an approximation based on your IP address and does not necessarily correspond to your citizenship or place of domicile.

Newsletter

Sign up for Insights newsletter

Newsletter

Sign up for Insights newsletter

Crime goes online – let’s talk about cybersecurity

What would happen if our Internet connections were sabotaged? What if our online activity trackers’ information suddenly were stolen? Data breaches are juicy business for cyber-criminals. You might not realise it yet, but they are just as dangerous as threats to our physical and personal security.

Print
share-mobile

Share

Share

In this podcast, our moderator and former BBC World News presenter Nisha Pillai talks to Julius Baer’s experts Alexander Ruchti and Esteban Polidura about how to fight and be prepared for cyber-threats, what these cyber risks mean for investors and businesses, and what to do about them.

Listen to the podcast
Click on the player below to listen to the conversation.

Alexander Ruchti, Julius Baer’s Next Generation Research Analyst, explains that when you hear the word ‘cybersecurity’, you might think only of cloud outages, malware or credit card scams. But there is another dimension of cybercrime happening within industry, especially inside global companies with vulnerable data/communication systems. This is why households, companies, and governments are spending more than ever to bulk up security. Meanwhile, some industries are agreeing international standards to protect themselves against vicious attacks.

Esteban Polidura, Julius Baer’s Head of Americas Advisory & Products, details the massive spending going on to safeguard the virtual space. Malicious cyber activity, he notes, robs the US economy of some USD 175 billion a year and the global economy some USD 600 billion. Unfortunately, the Covid-19 pandemic has fueled the fires of cybercrime, because it has driven more people than ever online – which in turn has spurred cybercriminals to innovate and devise new ways to rip the rest of us off.

We use cookies to make our website user-friendly for you. Please click "accept" or "customise settings" to customise which cookies will be set. Your preferences expire after six months. A default 'no consent' option applies in case no choice is made. Detailed information on the handling of cookies and data privacy, as well as your right to withdraw your consent at any time, can be found in our Data Privacy Policy.